Monday, April 11, 2005

Nope

There were no last minute heroics in the West Virginia Legislature during the closing days of the regular session this year. Despite the fact that the Table Gaming Bill (S.B. 442) passed the Senate more than two weeks ago, the House declined to act on it. This is farther than the bill got in last year's regular session.

House Speaker Kiss (D-Raleigh Co.) says that they may consider the legislation in during a special session in September. I certainly hope so. Not only would it make live play possible for me in the near future, it would also bring in an extra 200-300 million dollars in revenue to the state. Not to mention increase businesses and service because of the extra tourists.

For those of you who do not know what this bill will do, it will:
Make Table Gaming (Craps, BlackJack, Roulette, Poker, etc.) legal at the State's four existing race tracks. Under the existing bill, the residents of a county containing one of the race tracks would have to vote in favor of table gaming. I think that Jefferson County, home of Charles Town Races and Slots (3800 Slots - more than any one place in the US including Vegas) would vote for Table Gaming. The citizens, in my opinion, would vote for because they have seen the benefits to the local economy that slots brought.


Oh well, this just means I will have more time to hone my meager poker skills. Who knows, maybe I will find time in the next week or so to actually play some more online.

2 Comments:

At Tue Apr 12, 09:46:00 AM 2005, Anonymous Anonymous said...

I hope it passes too! You never know when a professional opportunity can come up in another state. I wonder if we could lobby Congress to get poker legal federally? Or is that a State's rights issue only?

Easycure

http://amomentwith.typepad.com/

 
At Sun Apr 17, 02:27:00 PM 2005, Blogger mortal_one said...

Easycure:
I will be "lobbying" as many of the members of the House of Delegates as I can. With any luck, they will pass it in a special session later this year.

B&M gambling is a State by State issue, whereas the Feds regulate online and "wire" (phone, fax, etc.) gambling. In general, the states control gambling unless it goes over statelines. Then the Feds step in.

I think it would, at this time be almost a wasted effort to lobby congress to make poker legal. The best we can do now is keep them from stating outright that online poker is illegal.

 

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